24 Reasons To Seek Out Fresh Figs

Dried figs are great and all, but if you’ve ever tasted a fresh fig you know that there’s no contest between the two. Sweet and honeyed, fresh figs are a rare treat meant to be savored. They were, after all, the foods of the gods. When you see figs in the supermarket or farmer’s market…

40 Truly Amazing Blueberry Recipes YUM!

We have blueberries to thank for some of our favorite foods. What would mornings be without them? We wouldn’t have blueberry muffins — the only truly great muffins out there — pancakes would be fruitless, and pie just wouldn’t be as awesome (because yes, you can eat pie for breakfast). For such a tiny fruit,…

The coffice: the future of work?

Still toiling away in a grey office building? Boring! According to BT’s ‘soonologist’, you’ll get more done with coffee, cake and connectivity Working in the coffice Only connect: who needs to commute when you can be a coffice worker? Age: As old as free Wi-Fi. Appearance: Half coffee shop, half office. Hence the name. Just…

Breakfast Interrupted

One of our most recent shoots, titled Breakfast Interrupted, is now live for your viewing pleasure. Shot primarily with the Phantom HD Gold at 1000fps, the piece is designed to showcase food in a beautiful and unusual way. The idea was brought to us by our friends at marlinnetwork.com, for their annual breakfast event. More…

How to crimp a pie

Points to remember Cover the top of your pie with pastry. Pick up the pie in one hand and use a small sharp knife in the other to trim away excess pastry. For a really simple neat finish, use the tines of a fork, pressing them all the way around the rim of the pie…

If You’re Not Stocking Your Fridge This Way, You’re Doing It Wrong

There are many clever ways to stop wasting so much food in your kitchen. You can freeze leftover wine to make wine slushies. You can regrow certain vegetables with nothing more than a cup of water and a windowsill. Or, you can check out Sherri Brooks Vinton’s new book “Eat It Up!” and learn all the tricks.

Vinton’s book offers recipes that’ll help you cook up pretty much any food scrap into a delicious meal ― think dishes like Radish Tops Tabouleh ― but it also shares other helpful tips along the way, like how to properly stock your fridge to fight food waste before it starts. Bonus: this can help you save some money too, because you won’t have let your lettuce wilt, again.

We have a super informative excerpt from the book for you below. Read it and live it.

EAT IT UP!
The following excerpt is from Sherri Brooks Vinton’s “Eat It Up!”

Out of sight, out of mind. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve meant to eat it, I’ve planned to eat it, I’ve wanted to eat it, but I just forgot it was there. A tasty bit of cheese in the back of the drawer, three lovely steamed shrimp, half a cup of caramel sauce—how could I forsake you? To avoid losing valuable bites to the chaos of the fridge, it helps to have a system. Try some of these tips:

All leftovers live on one shelf. Visit it first before making your next dinner plan or shopping list, to see what you can eat up.

It’s a date. Take a tip from the pros and label all leftovers or opened containers with a “made on” or “opened on” date. Keeping a roll of painter’s tape and a marker in a nearby drawer makes it easy.

Squirrel it away. Bought the big size because it was half the price? It’s not savings if you throw it out. When possible, section off the portion you can use right away and put the rest in the freezer. Works great for hard cheeses, family packs of meat and fish, cream cheese, butter, pasta sauce, breads, and cakes, and even keeps grains and flours fresher, longer.

Delicate on top. Sturdy produce, such as carrots, celery, apples, and broccoli, can live at the bottom of the crisper very happily. Layer more delicate items, such as peppers, peaches, and summer squashes that might bruise or crush on top of those. Lettuces, herbs, and other leafy items should be on the very top. Eat down through the layers.

Don’t show your perishables the door. Sure, it’s convenient to have the milk and eggs on the door for easy access, but it doesn’t guarantee the longest shelf life. Through the constant opening and closing, the items on the door see the highest temperatures. If you have a high turnover of milk and eggs, you might not notice a difference, but if those items are going off before you can enjoy them, you might relocate them to a cooler compartment. Leave the door for the much less.

Keep dairy on the low down. Yogurt, sour cream, and milk do best on the lower shelves of the fridge, where the air is colder.

Keep meat on the way low down. Meat should be stored at the lowest point in the fridge, preferably in a meat drawer if your fridge has one. Not only are the lowest shelves the coldest (cold air sinks), but you don’t want the juices from these items to drip on and contaminate any of your other refrigerated foods.

14 Clever Cooking Hacks You Need to Try

  Anyone who’s striving to follow a healthier diet should start by prepping more meals at home. Cooking your own food allows you to control portion sizes and ingredients used, not to mention it saves you money. But there is a learning curve when it comes to all that chopping, slicing, and dicing. That’s why…

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Follow My Blog

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

[jetpack_subscription_form show_only_email_and_button=”true” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” submit_button_classes=”undefined” show_subscribers_total=”false” ]